Monthly Archives: June 2011

This is THE BEST DOCUMENTED Blog about Fukushima that was obviously hidden from our view…. please read it for a fuller understanding of the crisis as it unfolded


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Is Iodine-131 Killing Babies In Philly?, Fox Philadelphia, June 16, 2011:


Is Iodine-131 Killing Babies In Philly?, Fox Philadelphia, June 16, 2011:

A researcher says the death rate among babies is up 48 percent since Iodine-131 was found in Philadelphia’s drinking water […]
Joseph Mangano is is the executive director of the Radiation And Public Health Project in New York, which is made of up scientists and health professionals. […]
Mangano said radiation combined with higher levels of iodine the EPAQ found in Philadelphia’s water two months ago may be killing young babies here. […]
[CDC data] shows an average of five infant deaths a week in the five weeks leading up to the fallout in Japan.
Then, for the 10 weeks after Japan, there was an average of 7. 5. […]

Fukushima: Global Survival Guide V2 update


Fukushima: Global Survival Guide
V2.
  1. Save all of these notes to your belongings and assets that are electronically stored on paper..          
  2. Write ALL of this down if available: secure everything:
    1. Hard Drive
    2. Removable Drive
    3. All other computers
    4. PRINT IT OFF
    5. PRINT IT OFF AND HAND IT TO EVERYONE YOU KNOW
    6. Do everything as quietly and quickly as possible.
  3. Put everything you know of financially or property realistic on paper and secure it in as many locations as you can.
    1. NO FRESH FOOD IS SAFE. In times of emergency, eat foods that are dried and stored and away from the outside…. STOCK UP ON WATER
    2. Buy paper money, water and tin food, and store it away from as much environment as you can.
  4. Safe places in emergency are not far away. Think of farm land, Mountains, Family holiday spots, and most importantly,- away from populated areas. REMEMBER… time of emergency calls for drastic action…. We are there now….
  5. The more coverage with plant life, the safer you are
  6. The more depth of simple cover like clay, the safer you are
  7. Place water through clay and boil it. It may not save us all, but is better than nothing,
  8. Leave clothing.. if you must venture out….. outside…… throw it away.. it will be irradiated.
  9. If you have someway to keep vegetables under cover.. grow them with rechargeable lights
  10. Money will be worthless as will electronic transfer. Keep foodstuffs and clothing for Barter; batteries, water, and a firearm are essentials.
  11. During a time like this nothing is irrational except the irrational.
  12. Keep plenty of plastic and paper containers that are disposable for personal hygiene.
  13. Spending all you have for a rainy day, to see another rainy day, should not be out of the question.
I have a Blog, but only to maintain the message…. Love to all

Fuku cover up…http://www.counterpunch.org/takashi03222011.html


They say as you move away the radiation is reduced in inverse ratio to the square of the distance. I want to say the reverse. Internal irradiation happens when radioactive material is ingested into the body. What happens? Say there is a nuclear particle one meter away from you. You breathe it in, it sticks inside your body; the distance between you and it is now at the micron level. One meter is 1000 millimeters, one micron is one thousandth of a millimeter. That’s a thousand times a thousand: a thousand squared. That’s the real meaning of “inverse ratio of the square of the distance.” Radiation exposure is increased by a factor of a trillion. Inhaling even the tiniest particle, that’s the danger.

You have GOT TO BE FRIKKIN JOKING!!!!!!


Tsuruga mayor still supports plan to build 2 more reactors

A photograph shows the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Plant in Tsuruga, Fukui Prefecture.(Mainichi)

A photograph shows the Tsuruga Nuclear Power Plant in Tsuruga, Fukui Prefecture.(Mainichi)

TOKYO (Kyodo) — The mayor of Tsuruga, Fukui Prefecture, has renewed his call for the planned construction of two more reactors at the Tsuruga nuclear power plant to go ahead, despite the nation’s rising anti-nuclear sentiment as a result of the ongoing crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.
“The central government should take primary responsibility for the safety of the reactors and go ahead with the plan,” Tsuruga Mayor Kazuharu Kawase told Kyodo News recently.
Japan Atomic Power Co. currently operates two reactors at the Tsuruga plant, and plans to start building two more reactors there next March.
Kawase said the Tsuruga plant is the city’s key industry and is a major contributor to the local economy in terms of employment and tax revenues.
The planned third and fourth reactors would be built with upgraded technologies and are expected to contribute to society both in terms of electric power and the environment, he said. “The newer a reactor is, the safer it is.”
Earlier, the central government worked out a new energy plan that calls for building 14 more reactors by 2030. But the Cabinet of Prime Minister Naoto Kan has pledged to review this after the crisis at the Fukushima plant triggered by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.
Currently, Fukui Prefecture hosts 13 reactors, the most of any prefecture. Of the 13, six are shut down for regular checks or because they have problems.

(Mainichi Japan) June 17, 2011

Gov’t allows part of radioactive tainted sludge to be buried


In this Monday, June 13, 2011 photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co., a machine collects radioactive substances in the air for sampling at the Unit 3 of the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)

In this Monday, June 13, 2011 photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co., a machine collects radioactive substances in the air for sampling at the Unit 3 of the crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture, northeastern Japan. (AP Photo/Tokyo Electric Power Co.)

TOKYO (Kyodo) — A government task force on nuclear emergency said Thursday it has decided to allow sludge containing 8,000 becquerels per kilogram or less of radioactive cesium to be buried in waste disposal sites only if residential houses are not built there in the future.
It also said sludge containing over 8,000 to 100,000 becquerels per kg of cesium could be buried after evaluating its safety individually, while sludge measuring more than 100,000 becquerels per kg should be kept under shielding but its final disposal manner is undecided.

Gov’t to designate new evacuation spots near Fukushima plant


Gov’t to designate new evacuation spots near Fukushima plant

The NNSA hazard map released by the U.S. federal government. The Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is marked by a white dot at right.

The NNSA hazard map released by the U.S. federal government. The Fukushima No. 1 Nuclear Power Plant is marked by a white dot at right.

TOKYO (Kyodo) — Japan has decided to designate new spots for possible evacuation near the crisis-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant that are feared to have radiation levels which go beyond an internationally recommended benchmark, the top government spokesman said Thursday.
The policy on the areas dubbed as “hot spots” will cover specific households in a residential area, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said at a news conference. Currently, the government in principle imposes an evacuation order on a municipality basis.
He said the government will support those who wish to evacuate from the hot spots and that children and pregnant women especially are urged to leave the spots, which register radiation levels that could exceed the 20-millisieverts yardstick a year.
Edano also said, “We see that there is no such risk that warrants a blanket evacuation,” indicating it is not necessary to make the evacuation from the spots mandatory.
He added the government at the same time needs to give the heads-up to residents on a possibility that by staying in the hot spots for too long every day, they may end up accumulating more than 20 millisieverts.
The benchmark of 20 millisieverts is based on a recommendation by the International Atomic Energy Agency that the annual limit of radiation level should be in the range of 20 to 100 millisieverts in an emergency.
Following the start of the nuclear crisis, the government has prohibited entry into a 20-kilometer radius of the Fukushima plant, which continues to emit radiation, and ordered the evacuation of people in designated areas outside the zone where radiation levels are feared to surpass the limit.

read the entire article at:
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/20110617p2g00m0dm018000c.html